Archive for the ‘King David’ Tag

PSALM 40:6-8

“Sacrifice and offering You did not desire;
My ears You have opened;
Burnt offering and sin offering You did not require.
Then I said, ‘Behold, I come;
In the scroll of the Book it is written of me.
I delight to do Your will, O my God,
And Your law is within my heart'”(Psalm 40:6-8).

God desires us to obey the commands He directs toward us and to obey the Ten Commandments, above personal sacrifices and prescribed burnt rituals. Here David speaks of the priest and prophet Samuel’s experience recorded in 1 Samuel 15 in regards to King Saul. Saul and his army had just decimated the Amalekites as the Lord had commanded him to do. But Saul did not follow the Lord’s command to also destroy all the enemy’s livestock, but rather took them as plunder. Saul intended to sacrifice the best sheep and oxen to God, as was the Israelite’s religious practice. But God, through Samuel, communicated to Saul that obedience is required above sacrifice and burnt offerings. To fully realize this required an opening of the ears to God’s wishes, instead of one’s inclination to do what one thinks is best, as Saul did.

God, in His infinite wisdom, always directs us to do what is best for us. Samuel, as well as David, realized this. Sacrificing to the Lord is fine, but true worship of God requires obedience to God, first and foremost. This is a prime ingredient to spiritual growth. If we live our lives in line with God’s requirements as revealed in the Bible, we can also say, “Behold, I come. I delight to do Your will, O my God.” We can serve God with joyful hearts because His Law is indelibly inscribed on our hearts. Our obedience to Him flows as a wellspring from our hearts.

(Quoted Scripture from NKJV.)

PSALM 40:1-3, a Psalm of David

“I waited patiently for the Lord;
And He inclined to me,
And heard my cry.
He also brought me up out of a horrible pit,
Out of miry clay, and set my feet upon a rock,
And established my steps.
He has put a new song in my mouth —
Praise to our God;
Many will see it and fear,
And will trust in the Lord”(Psalm 40:1-3).

Most of us, when in a terrible situation, eventually cry out to the Lord after we’ve exhausted our other possible sources of help. Not David. He cried out almost immediately to God for assistance. In faith, with patience, he waited for God’s help. He was in a horrible pit situation, perhaps being pursued by a jealous King Saul and his army. David couldn’t even move. He was stuck, as in heavy, mucky clay. Yet he didn’t despair because he knew God would help Him.

God did more than rescue David. He set him on safe, solid ground and guided his next moves — indeed, when David permitted, God directed his entire life. The Lord had a powerful effect on David’s outlook on life. David made a habit of giving God the credit — of praising Him. Often we, too, praise God after he’s rescued us. This is a form of worship God loves to receive.

Those who witness God snatch us from harm and hear us praise God will be in awe of God and put their trust in Him.

In my coming novel, THE CASTING OF CROWNS, John typifies many wordly, young men. He trusts in himself, not in God. Whereas, John’s girlfriend, Carissa, develops a growing relationship with Jesus, learning to lean on Jesus. You can see the friction. Will John swing toward God and what other challenges and dangers does Carissa face in this Last Days scenario?

Why do you feel it’s difficult today for people to abandon their own efforts in the face of trouble and instead lean on the Lord? Please feel free to comment.

(Quoted Scripture from NKJV.)

WINTER READS

It’s the doldrums of an Arctic-like winter here in Wisconsin this week in January. Time for me to curl up with a good book. What do I like to read? Well, suspense holds my interest the best, science fiction is a new, attractive genre for me, and non-fiction of any kind feeds my mind’s thirst for knowledge.

The book I chose today is the Bible. I somehow neglect it at times but am always drawn back to it. Why? It contains knowledge, wisdom, and guidance far above human writers’ abilities to create on their own. The Bible is God-inspired and contains truth for all humanity throughout the ages. But the Bible is not entertaining, you may counter. Actually, the Bible is chalked full of heroes and heroines whose lives are recorded not only for our spiritual development, but to show their colorful lives, linking them to our own human tendencies, thereby showing relevance to us. Look at King David’s adultery with Bathsheba and the ensuing events. The whole story reads like a soap opera. Maybe we should turn off our TVs and open the Bible for something better than entertainment — enrichment. David’s life is recorded in 1 Samuel 16 through 1 Kings 2.

Many people I’ve spoken with see nothing relevant to our lives recorded in the Old Testament. They see only the Jews whose customs are distinctly different from our own. Since God does not change, His character recorded in His handling of the Israelites in the Old Testament is the same character He has today. Knowledge of God’s character displaying mercy, justice, love, compassion, abhorrence of sin, among other attributes, is integral to our being able to come to God without fear and to abide in Christ. That trusting, loving bond with Christ is our ticket to eternity with Him. There is no other way.

Do you have thoughts on a character in the Bible you’d like to share with others? Perhaps reading about that Biblical person has affected your life in some way. Feel free to comment.

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